A parliament of medicine no more: @CMA_Docs changes its governance

 

CMA

The Canadian Medical Association (@CMA_Docs) is not immune to the dramatic changes in governance impacting governments and organizations around the world.

At its annual gathering this August in Winnipeg, the CMA’s General Council will cease to exist as “the parliament of medicine” and a major policy making body, and will be substituted with a healthcare summit aimed at attracting a much more diverse audience to advance the debate about health care in Canada.

For those who have sat through decades of often intense debate by physician representatives from across the country, on issues as important as abortion, physician aid in dying, and the future of medicare, this is a dramatic change. But, frankly it is not a surprising one as the CMA has been transitioning its policy-making processes for a few years now.

While CMA General Council often made great theatre and was guaranteed to attract front-page news for the organization, the issues discussed where often not within the strategic framework of where the organization wanted to head. The CMA has been clear it wants to broaden the funnel for collecting new policy ideas from a council of 200 plus selected representatives from its provincial and territorial associations, to the membership as a whole.

The elimination of General Council will be perhaps the most obvious but, given various announcements on the association’s cma.ca website, certainly not the only governance change being planned by the organization and voted on this year.

For instance in order to better align the CMA with its new mission statement as “empowering and caring for patients”, the CMA Board of Directors wants to add a non-physician to bring the patient representative to its Board of Directors. While a radical step for the CMA, this is in keeping with what many other medical organizations are doing.

That’s not the only change envisaged for the Board. Rather than allocating numbers of Board representatives based by number of physicians in a jurisdiction each province and territory would have just one Board member. This would shrink the size of the Board from the current size of 26 to 18 or 19 members including ongoing representation from students and residents.

The annual general meeting which was always held in conjunction with General Council will continue to expand its role for ratifying business decisions and after this year will move from August to the spring in 2019.

Those who will remember the extensive CMA governance review process that culminated in 2008 with arguably minor changes to governance will appreciate just how much and how fast the world is changing, to see what CMA will be doing this year.

Sir Charles Tupper may not be rolling over in his grave but it will be very interesting to see how CMA members do in keeping up to the speed at which their organization is moving.

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