Disrupting a futuristic health care system near you – patients #CADTHsymp

CADTH

Artificial intelligence, genetic engineering, targeted wonder drugs? The opening plenary on the topic of disruptive technologies in healthcare transformation at arguably Canada’s top health technology policy conference held the promise of all of these.

But patient partnering and involving patients?

Indeed.

Perhaps it should be no surprise that discussion at one of the first Canadian healthcare organizations to wholeheartedly embrace patient involvement, the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH), should settle on patient participation as the biggest potential disrupters in health care in the years to come.

Opening presenter at the CADTH symposium in Edmonton, Dr. Irfan Dhalla, VP of Evidence Development and Standards at Health Quality Ontario, set the stage by stating that biggest change to health care in next few decades may be partnering with patients for not just their own care but in how we organize health care and run health care organizations.

Dr. Dhalla said he came to this conclusion after crowdsourcing input through Twitter on the most disruptive technology to come and found that patient input was by far the most popular response. During the session when he delved into more technical issues of how reassessment of health technology assessments should be done, he stated it must be done “with patients at the table.”

Other speakers on the plenary panel also touched on this theme. Carole McMahon a patient, caregiver and patient advocate stated that in future patients should have new roles such as in helping design clinical trials or in designing patient surveys.

At the end of the session when asked what changes the panelists would make to improve health care, involving patients was among their answers.

Despite being a strong leader in patient partnering, CADTH was not spared criticisms from the patient community at this year’s conference.

A conference session on patient engagement that was listed with four speakers and no obvious patient presence was the subject of a critical tweet prior to the main conference that generated widespread concern from the patient community. “I find this unrelentingly frustrating,” was one response. “These kinds of presentations have the potential to actually ‘model’ what they’re allegedly talking about.”

Fear not though, the patient presence remains strong on the second day of the conference tomorrow beginning at a breakfast session at which Zal Press (@PatientCommando) will be hosting a session on the “thorny issue” of patient compensation in research and health care.

And lest people fear, the debate between patients might become too intense as it did at times at least year’s Halifax meeting, CADTH now has a meeting code of conduct that notes “harassment or disrespectful conduct do not belong at any CADTH event” including “sustained disruption of a speaker” and “grouping or isolating.”

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